Wednesday, February 21, 2007

The Debates (Virginia) June 25, 1788:

Excerpts;

...The amendments contained in this paper are those we wish; but we shall agree to any others which will not destroy the spirit of the Constitution, or that will better secure liberty....

...I have no dread that they will immediately infringe the dearest rights of the people, but that the operation of the government will be oppressive in process of time. Shall we not pursue the dictates of common sense, and the example of all free and wise nations, and insist on amendments with manly fortitude? ...

...What are the great objections now made? Are they local? What are the amendments brought forth by my friends? Do they not contemplate the great interests of the people, and of the Union at large? ...

... States are but an aggregate of individuals...

...Because we have granted power. Because the amendments you propose will diminish their power...

...We only wish to do away ambiguities, and establish our rights on clear and explicit terms. If this be done, we shall all be like one man--we shall unite and be happy...

...The people are not to be disarmed of their weapons. They are left in full possession of them...


Full article here.

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